The EU’s ‘Eurobarometer’ — December 2018

Graham Charles Lear
3 min readFeb 11, 2019

Twice a year the EU commissions a large survey of public opinion, from which it monitors how it is doing, and from which it trumpets any small movements in the popularity of its policy objectives. This is called “The Eurobarometer’ and each time it is published I bring readers some highlights. The following information comes from the December report.

Twice a year the EU commissions a large survey of public opinion, from which it monitors how it is doing, and from which it trumpets any small movements in the popularity of its policy objectives.

European and British opinions on the EU, Dec 2018

Only 42% of people across Europe trust the EU

In the UK it’s worse — only 31% of British people trust the EU

This has fallen by 4% in the last six months alone

Only 28% of Brits support an economic and monetary union — a core EU objective

Only 33% of Brits feel “my voice counts” in the EU

This is the EU’s own, official survey

It’s important to recognize that the EU Commission relies heavily on this survey. This version took place in 28 Member States and in the 5 candidate countries plus the Turkish part of Cyprus, with citizens aged 15 and over. The candidate countries are Turkey, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and Albania.

15.9% of the results come from citizens of countries wishing to join the EU, almost all for economic reasons.

The above results will come as grim reading for the Remain campaign. Those advocating a Losers’ Vote might wish to take note. If only three in ten Britons have trust in the EU, this says a lot about the people’s ability to distill the truth from the incessant propaganda they read, see and hear in the media.

How the EU Commission Skews the Results

For this official EU survey, there were 32,600 interviews carried out in people’s homes, of which 5,176 were from non-EU countries. That’s 15.9% of the interviews which were conducted with people from countries wishing to join the EU, almost all for economic reasons.

The second point to note is the astonishing length of these interviews. At over 200 questions, who has time to sit for a survey of this length?

The third point to mention is the lower age limit. The EU has numerous programmes aimed at promoting EU federalism to young people, some of which are deeply disturbing to many people. By including children in the survey, some of the results might be questionable, to say the least. Imagine a 15-year-old, by the time he was asked question number 209. “Yeah, whatever.”

Despite all of the attempts to skew the results, however, they must be very disappointing for those anti-democrats in the UK who wish to thwart the largest exercise of democracy in our history.

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Graham Charles Lear

What is life without a little controversy in it? Quite boring and sterile would be my answer.